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When are moving images remembered better? Study–test congruence and the dynamic superiority effect

Buratto, Luciano G and Matthews, William J and Lamberts, Koen (2009) 'When are moving images remembered better? Study–test congruence and the dynamic superiority effect.' The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 62 (10). pp. 1896-1903. ISSN 1747-0218

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Abstract

It has previously been shown that moving images are remembered better than static ones. In two experiments, we investigated the basis for this dynamic superiority effect. Participants studied scenes presented as a single static image, a sequence of still images, or a moving video clip, and 3 days later completed a recognition test in which familiar and novel scenes were presented in all three formats. We found a marked congruency effect: For a given study format, accuracy was highest when test items were shown in the same format. Neither the dynamic superiority effect nor the study-test congruency effect were affected by encoding (Experiment 1) or retrieval (Experiment 2) manipulations, suggesting that these effects are relatively impervious to strategic control. The results demonstrate that the spatio-temporal properties of complex, realistic scenes are preserved in long-term memory.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: recognition, long-term memory, pictures, motion, perceptual specificity
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Psychology, Department of
Depositing User: Jim Jamieson
Date Deposited: 04 Nov 2011 15:57
Last Modified: 04 Nov 2011 15:57
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/1241

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