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Using implementation intentions to increase attendance for cervical cancer screening

Sheeran, P and Orbell, S (2000) 'Using implementation intentions to increase attendance for cervical cancer screening.' Health Psychology, 19 (3). 283 - 289. ISSN 0278-6133

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Abstract

This article evaluates an intervention based on P. M. Gollwitzer's (1993) concept of implementation intentions. Women registered at a medical practice in rural England (N = 114) completed measures of the theory of planned behavior variables before a manipulation that induced one half of the sample to form implementation intentions specifying when, where, and how they would make the appointment. Subsequent attendance was determined from medical records. Findings show that the theory of planned behavior variables and previous delay behavior provided good prediction of attendance. However, despite equivalent motivation to attend, participants who formed implementation intentions were much more likely to attend for screening compared with controls (92% vs. 69%). Evidence also suggests that implementation intentions attenuated the relationship between previous delay behavior and subsequent attendance.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Psychology, Department of
Depositing User: Users 161 not found.
Date Deposited: 12 Feb 2015 20:09
Last Modified: 17 Aug 2017 17:40
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/12712

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