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Perceived social support and parental education as determinants of adolescents’ physical activity and eating behaviour: a cross-sectional survey

Glozah, Franklin N and Pevalin, David J (2015) 'Perceived social support and parental education as determinants of adolescents’ physical activity and eating behaviour: a cross-sectional survey.' International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, 27 (3). pp. 253-259. ISSN 0334-0139

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Abstract

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title> <jats:p><jats:bold>Purpose:</jats:bold> To examine the role of perceived social support and parental education on physical activity and eating behaviour of Ghanaian adolescents.</jats:p> <jats:p><jats:bold>Methods:</jats:bold> Seven hundred and seventy Senior High School students (504 boys and 266 girls) between the ages of 14–21 years participated by completing questionnaires on perceived social support, physical activity and eating behaviour. The highest education attained by either parent or guardian was also obtained. Multivariate analysis of covariance was the main statistical test used to analyse the data.</jats:p> <jats:p><jats:bold>Results:</jats:bold> The results showed significant gender differences in physical activity and eating behaviour combined, with boys more likely to engage in physical activity than girls, and girls also more likely to engage in healthy eating behaviour than boys, albeit the effect was not statistically significant. While perceived social support had a significant positive effect on eating behaviour and physical activity, parental education had a significant effect only on eating behaviour but not physical activity.</jats:p> <jats:p><jats:bold>Conclusion:</jats:bold> Perceived social support from family coupled with parental education provides more opportunities for adolescents to engage in healthy eating behaviour. Also, parents’ educational attainment alone does not necessarily guarantee that adolescents will engage in physical activity; providing the needed social support and conducive home environment is more likely to induce physical activity behaviours. Finally, physical activity and eating behaviour should not be construed as alternative health behaviours as suggested by gender differentials in these health behaviours.</jats:p>

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Humans; Multivariate Analysis; Cross-Sectional Studies; Adolescent Behavior; Feeding Behavior; Health Behavior; Motor Activity; Parent-Child Relations; Parents; Life Style; Age Distribution; Sex Distribution; Social Support; Schools; Students; Adolescent; Educational Status; Ghana; Female; Male; Young Adult; Surveys and Questionnaires
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Faculty of Social Sciences
Faculty of Social Sciences > Sociology, Department of
SWORD Depositor: Elements
Depositing User: Elements
Date Deposited: 11 Feb 2015 10:58
Last Modified: 13 Jan 2022 22:00
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/12833

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