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Color categories are not universal: replications and new evidence from a stone-age culture

Roberson, D and Davies, I and Davidoff, J (2000) 'Color categories are not universal: replications and new evidence from a stone-age culture.' Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 129 (3). pp. 369-398. ISSN 0096-3445

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Abstract

The authors sought to replicate and extend the work of E. Rosch Heider (1972) on the Dani with a comparable group from Papua, New Guinea, who speak Berinmo, which has 5 basic color terms. Naming and memory for highly saturated focal, non-focal, and low-saturation stimuli from around the color space were investigated. Recognition of desaturated colors was affected by color vocabulary. When response bias was controlled, there was no recognition advantage for focal stimuli. Paired-associate learning also failed to show an advantage for focal stimuli. Categorical Perception effects for both English and Berinmo were found, but only at the boundaries of existing linguistic categories. It is concluded that possession of linguistic categories facilitates recognition and influences perceptual judgments.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health
Faculty of Science and Health > Psychology, Department of
SWORD Depositor: Elements
Depositing User: Elements
Date Deposited: 23 Jul 2015 12:27
Last Modified: 15 Jan 2022 01:05
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/12996

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