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Metabolomic response of Calotropis procera growing in the desert to changes in water availability

Ramadan, A and Sabir, JSM and Alakilli, SYM and Shokry, AM and Gadalla, NO and Edris, S and Al-Kordy, MA and Al-Zahrani, HS and El-Domyati, FM and Bahieldin, A and Baker, NR and Willmitzer, L and Irgang, S (2014) 'Metabolomic response of Calotropis procera growing in the desert to changes in water availability.' PLoS ONE, 9 (2). ISSN 1932-6203

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Abstract

Water availability is a major limitation for agricultural productivity. Plants growing in severe arid climates such as deserts provide tools for studying plant growth and performance under extreme drought conditions. The perennial species Calotropis procera used in this study is a shrub growing in many arid areas which has an exceptional ability to adapt and be productive in severe arid conditions. We describe the results of studying the metabolomic response of wild C procera plants growing in the desert to a one time water supply. Leaves of C. procera plants were taken at three time points before and 1 hour, 6 hours and 12 hours after watering and subjected to a metabolomics and lipidomics analysis. Analysis of the data reveals that within one hour after watering C. procera has already responded on the metabolic level to the sudden water availability as evidenced by major changes such as increased levels of most amino acids, a decrease in sucrose, raffinose and maltitol, a decrease in storage lipids (triacylglycerols) and an increase in membrane lipids including photosynthetic membranes. These changes still prevail at the 6 hour time point after watering however 12 hours after watering the metabolomics data are essentially indistinguishable from the prewatering state thus demonstrating not only a rapid response to water availability but also a rapid response to loss of water. Taken together these data suggest that the ability of C. procera to survive under the very harsh drought conditions prevailing in the desert might be associated with its rapid adjustments to water availability and losses. © 2014 Ramadan et al.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Biological Sciences, School of
Depositing User: Jim Jamieson
Date Deposited: 19 May 2015 15:02
Last Modified: 30 Jan 2019 16:21
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/13756

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