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The Differentiation of Security Forces and the Onset of Genocidal Violence

Pilster, U and Böhmelt, T and Tago, A (2016) 'The Differentiation of Security Forces and the Onset of Genocidal Violence.' Armed Forces and Society, 42 (1). 26 - 50. ISSN 0095-327X

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Abstract

Which factors drive the onset of genocidal violence? While the previous literature identified several important influences, states’ military capabilities for conducting mass-killings and the structure of their security forces have received surprisingly little attention so far. The authors take this shortcoming as a motivation for their research. A theoretical framework is developed, which argues that more differentiated security forces, that is, forces that are composed of a higher number of independent paramilitary and military organizations, are likely to act as a restraint factor in the process leading to state-sponsored mass-killings. Quantitative analyses support the argument for a sample of state-failure years for 1971–2003, and it is also shown that considering a state’s security force structure improves our ability to forecast genocides.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: J Political Science > JA Political science (General)
Divisions: Faculty of Social Sciences > Government, Department of
Depositing User: Users 161 not found.
Date Deposited: 21 Jul 2015 11:14
Last Modified: 07 Apr 2021 19:15
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/13808

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