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A cross-cultural comparison of body composition, physical fitness and physical activity between regional samples of Canadian and English children and adolescents

Voss, C and Sandercock, G and Higgins, JW and Macdonald, H and Nettlefold, L and Naylor, PJ and McKay, H (2014) 'A cross-cultural comparison of body composition, physical fitness and physical activity between regional samples of Canadian and English children and adolescents.' Canadian Journal of Public Health, 105 (4). ISSN 0008-4263

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Abstract

Objectives: Cross-cultural comparisons in children's body composition, health-related fitness and physical activity (PA) are rare due to a shortage of comparable data, but such comparisons may help avert worrying global prevalence in childhood obesity, and declining fitness and P.A. Methods: We drew samples of Canadian and English children (10 years, n=1630, 50% boys) and adolescents (15 years, n=1406, 56% boys) from three separate, regional studies that conducted comparable school-based assessments (2006-2011). For each age-sex group, we assessed betweencountry differences for body composition (mass, height, BMI, waist circumference), cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF; 20 m shuttle run test), strength (handgrip) and self-reported P.A. We used multiple regression to investigate whether between-country differences in fitness were explained by body composition and P.A. Results: At any age, Canadian boys and girls were taller, heavier, and had greater BMIs and waist circumferences. English children had higher CRF than Canadians, which was explained by differences in body composition and P.A. Canadian children were significantly stronger, partly due to greater body size. There were no between-country differences in adolescent boys. Canadian adolescent girls reported more PA than their English counterparts, but neither PA nor body size explained why Canadian adolescent girls had greater CRF or strength. Conclusion: Future cross-cultural studies of PA should include indices of growth and fitness to better understand the relationship between intricate differences in PA and health outcomes. © Canadian Public Health Association, 2014. All rights reserved.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Sport, Rehabilitation and Exercise Sciences, School of
Depositing User: Jim Jamieson
Date Deposited: 30 Jun 2015 15:48
Last Modified: 30 Jan 2019 16:22
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/14177

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