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Sensory-processing sensitivity moderates the association between childhood experiences and adult life satisfaction

Booth, Charlotte and Standage, Helen and Fox, Elaine (2015) 'Sensory-processing sensitivity moderates the association between childhood experiences and adult life satisfaction.' Personality and Individual Differences, 87. pp. 24-29. ISSN 0191-8869

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Abstract

There are few studies testing the differential susceptibility hypothesis (DSH: hypothesizing that some individuals are more responsive to both positive and negative experiences) with adult personality traits. The current study examined the DSH by investigating the moderating effect of sensory-processing sensitivity (SPS) on childhood experiences and life satisfaction. A total of 185 adults completed measures of SPS, positive/negative childhood experiences and life satisfaction. SPS did moderate the association between childhood experiences and life satisfaction. Simple slopes analysis compared those reporting high and low SPS (+/− 1 SD) and revealed that the difference was observed only for those who reported negative childhood experiences; with the high SPS group reporting lower life satisfaction. There was no difference observed in those reporting positive childhood experiences, which supported a diathesis-stress model rather than the DSH.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Personality; Stress and coping; Life satisfaction; Differential susceptibility; Sensory processing sensitivity
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Psychology, Department of
Depositing User: Jim Jamieson
Date Deposited: 31 Jul 2015 08:25
Last Modified: 31 Jul 2015 08:37
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/14465

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