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Preferential decoding of emotion from human non-linguistic vocalizations versus speech prosody

Pell, MD and Rothermich, K and Liu, P and Paulmann, S and Sethi, S and Rigoulot, S (2015) 'Preferential decoding of emotion from human non-linguistic vocalizations versus speech prosody.' Biological Psychology, 111. 14 - 25. ISSN 0301-0511

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Abstract

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. This study used event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to compare the time course of emotion processing from non-linguistic vocalizations versus speech prosody, to test whether vocalizations are treated preferentially by the neurocognitive system. Participants passively listened to vocalizations or pseudo-utterances conveying anger, sadness, or happiness as the EEG was recorded. Simultaneous effects of vocal expression type and emotion were analyzed for three ERP components (N100, P200, late positive component). Emotional vocalizations and speech were differentiated very early (N100) and vocalizations elicited stronger, earlier, and more differentiated P200 responses than speech. At later stages (450-700. ms), anger vocalizations evoked a stronger late positivity (LPC) than other vocal expressions, which was similar but delayed for angry speech. Individuals with high trait anxiety exhibited early, heightened sensitivity to vocal emotions (particularly vocalizations). These data provide new neurophysiological evidence that vocalizations, as evolutionarily primitive signals, are accorded precedence over speech-embedded emotions in the human voice.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Psychology, Department of
Depositing User: Jim Jamieson
Date Deposited: 31 Aug 2015 15:15
Last Modified: 23 Jan 2019 05:16
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/14738

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