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If Visual Saliency Predicts Search, Then Why? Evidence from Normal and Gaze-Contingent Search Tasks in Natural Scenes

Foulsham, T and Underwood, G (2011) 'If Visual Saliency Predicts Search, Then Why? Evidence from Normal and Gaze-Contingent Search Tasks in Natural Scenes.' Cognitive Computation, 3 (1). 48 - 63. ISSN 1866-9956

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Abstract

The Itti and Koch (Vision Research 40: 1489-1506, 2000) saliency map model has inspired a wealth of research testing the claim that bottom-up saliency determines the placement of eye fixations in natural scenes. Although saliency seems to correlate with (although not necessarily cause) fixation in free-viewing or encoding tasks, it has been suggested that visual saliency can be overridden in a search task, with saccades being planned on the basis of target features, rather than being captured by saliency. Here, we find that target regions of a scene that are salient according to this model are found quicker than control regions (Experiment 1). However, this does not seem to be altered by filtering features in the periphery using a gaze-contingent display (Experiment 2), and a deeper analysis of the eye movements made suggests that the saliency effect is instead due to the meaning of the scene regions. Experiment 3 supports this interpretation, showing that scene inversion reduces the saliency effect. These results suggest that saliency effects on search may have nothing to do with bottom-up saccade guidance. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Psychology, Department of
Depositing User: Jim Jamieson
Date Deposited: 24 Nov 2011 09:43
Last Modified: 05 Feb 2019 15:15
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/1493

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