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Implicit Self-Importance in an Interpersonal Pronoun Categorization Task

Fetterman, Adam K and Robinson, Michael D and Gilbertson, Elizabeth P (2014) 'Implicit Self-Importance in an Interpersonal Pronoun Categorization Task.' Current Psychology, 33 (2). pp. 185-198. ISSN 1046-1310

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Abstract

Object relations theories emphasize the manner in which the salience/importance of implicit representations of self and other guide interpersonal functioning. Two studies and a pilot test (total N = 304) sought to model such representations. In dyadic contexts, the self is a “you” and the other is a “me”, as verified in a pilot test. Study 1 then used a simple categorization task and found evidence for implicit self-importance: The pronoun “you” was categorized more quickly and accurately when presented in a larger font size, whereas the pronoun “me” was categorized more quickly and accurately when presented in a smaller font size. Study 2 showed that this pattern possesses value in understanding individual differences in interpersonal functioning. As predicted, arrogant people scored higher in implicit self-importance in the paradigm. Findings are discussed from the perspective of dyadic interpersonal dynamics.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Object relations; Self; Other; Interpersonal; Implicit; Size; Metaphor
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Psychology, Department of
Depositing User: Jim Jamieson
Date Deposited: 22 Sep 2015 14:35
Last Modified: 17 Dec 2015 11:06
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/14973

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