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Networking Our Way to Better Ecosystem Service Provision

Bohan, DA and Landuyt, D and Ma, A and Macfadyen, S and Martinet, V and Massol, F and McInerny, G and Montoya, JM and Mulder, C and Pascual, U and Pocock, MJO and White, P and Blanchemanche, S and Bonkowski, M and Bretagnolle, V and Brönmark, C and Dicks, L and Dumbrell, A and Eisenhauer, N and Friberg, N and Gessner, MO and Gill, RJ and Gray, C and Haughton, A and Ibanez, S and Jensen, J and Jeppesen, E and Jokela, J and Lacroix, G and Lannou, C and Lavorel, S and Le Galliard, JF and Lescourret, F and Liu, S and Loeuille, N and McLaughlin, O and Muggleton, S and Peñuelas, J and Petanidou, T and Petit, S and Pomati, F and Raffaelli, D and Rasmussen, J and Raybould, A and Reboud, X and Richard, G and Christoph, and Scheu, S and Sutherland, WJ and Tamaddoni-Nezhad, A and Ter Braak, C and Termansen, M and Thompson, MSA and Tscharntke, T and Vacher, C and van der Geest, H and Voigt, W and Arie Vonk, J and Zhou, X and Woodward, G (2016) 'Networking Our Way to Better Ecosystem Service Provision.' Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 31 (2). 105 - 115. ISSN 0169-5347

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Abstract

The ecosystem services (EcoS) concept is being used increasingly to attach values to natural systems and the multiple benefits they provide to human societies. Ecosystem processes or functions only become EcoS if they are shown to have social and/or economic value. This should assure an explicit connection between the natural and social sciences, but EcoS approaches have been criticized for retaining little natural science. Preserving the natural, ecological science context within EcoS research is challenging because the multiple disciplines involved have very different traditions and vocabularies (common-language challenge) and span many organizational levels and temporal and spatial scales (scale challenge) that define the relevant interacting entities (interaction challenge). We propose a network-based approach to transcend these discipline challenges and place the natural science context at the heart of EcoS research.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Life Sciences, School of
Depositing User: Jim Jamieson
Date Deposited: 08 Mar 2016 14:59
Last Modified: 30 Mar 2021 10:15
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/16212

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