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Media device ownership and media use: Associations with sedentary time, physical activity and fitness in English youth

Sandercock, GRH and Alibrahim, M and Bellamy, M (2016) 'Media device ownership and media use: Associations with sedentary time, physical activity and fitness in English youth.' Preventive Medicine Reports, 4. 162 - 168. ISSN 2211-3355

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Abstract

© 2016 The Authors. The aim of this study was to determine whether ownership and use of electronic media were associated with sedentary time and cardiorespiratory fitness (fitness) in youth. We also aimed to determine if associations were independent of physical activity (PA).Fitness was measured using the 20 m shuttle-run. PA, sedentary time, ownership of media devices and media use were self-reported.Participants (n = 678, age 10-15 years) reported daily sedentary time of 620 (±. 210) min. Forty-one percent of participants had low PA and 50.4% had low fitness.Higher weekend sedentary time was associated with low fitness in girls (p = 0.005) and boys (p < 0.001) and remained significant when adjusted for PA in the latter (p = 0.006). Using social media was associated with higher sedentary time in both sexes and low fitness in girls. High sedentary time was more likely (OR = 5.3, 95%CI: 2.0-14.4) in boys who owned game consoles. Low fitness was more likely in boys who owned digital/satellite TV receivers (OR = 1.8, 95%CI: 1.8-3.2).Schoolchildren spent >. 10 h or ~. 85% of each waking day sedentary. Use of social media was associated with higher sedentary time in both sexes and with low fitness in girls. Reducing social media use in youth offers one potential target for intervention. Behaviours associated with sedentary time differed from predictors of low fitness. The complex and often sex-specific interactions identified between sedentary time, PA and fitness suggest the need for carefully targeted interventions to reduce sedentary time and improve fitness in English youth.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Sport, Rehabilitation and Exercise Sciences, School of
Depositing User: Jim Jamieson
Date Deposited: 07 Jun 2016 09:59
Last Modified: 30 Jan 2019 16:20
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/16870

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