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Skeletal Maturation, Body Size, and Motor Coordination in Youth 11-14 Years

Freitas, DL and Lausen, B and Maia, JAR and Gouveia, R and Thomis, M and Lefevre, J and Silva, RD and Malina, RM (2016) 'Skeletal Maturation, Body Size, and Motor Coordination in Youth 11-14 Years.' Medicine And Science In Sports And Exercise, 48 (6). 1129 - 1135. ISSN 0195-9131

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Abstract

Purpose: The objective of this study is to estimate the relative contribution of biological maturation to variance in the motor coordination (MC) among youth and to explore gender differences in the associations. Methods: Skeletal maturation (Tanner-Whitehouse 3), stature, body mass, and MC (Körperkoordinationstest für Kinder) were assessed in 613 youths, 284 boys and 329 girls 11–14 yr of age. Standardized residuals of skeletal age on chron↲ ological age were used as the estimate of skeletal maturity status independent of chronological age. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to analyse associations between skeletal maturity status and MC. Results: Skeletal maturity status by itself, i.e., standardized residuals of skeletal age on chronological age (step 3) explained a maximum of 8.1% of the variance in MC in boys (ΔR32 in the range of 0.0%–8.1%) and 2.8% of the variance in girls (ΔR32 in the range of 0.0%–2.8%), after controlling for stature, body mass and interactions of the standardized residuals of skeletal age on chronological age with stature and body mass. Corresponding percentages for the interactions of the standardized residuals of skeletal age and stature and body mass, after adjusting for stature and body mass (step 2) were 8.7% in boys (ΔR22 in the range of 0.3%–8.7%) and 7.1% in girls (ΔR22 in the range of 0.1%–7.1%). Chow tests suggested structural changes in β-coefficients in the four MC tests among boys and girls, 12–13 yr. Conclusion: The percentage of variance in the four MC tests explained by skeletal maturation was relatively small, but the relationships differed between boys and girls. By inference, other factors, e.g., neuromuscular maturation, specific instruction and practice, sport participation, and others may influence MC at these ages.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Mathematical Sciences, Department of
Depositing User: Jim Jamieson
Date Deposited: 13 Jul 2016 10:02
Last Modified: 27 Sep 2018 10:15
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/17111

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