Research Repository

Does Size Matter? Atmospheric CO2 May Be a Stronger Driver of Stomatal Closing Rate Than Stomatal Size in Taxa That Diversified under Low CO2

Elliott-Kingston, Caroline and Haworth, Matthew and Yearsley, Jon M and Batke, Sven P and Lawson, Tracy and McElwain, Jennifer C (2016) 'Does Size Matter? Atmospheric CO2 May Be a Stronger Driver of Stomatal Closing Rate Than Stomatal Size in Taxa That Diversified under Low CO2.' Frontiers in Plant Science, 7 (AUG201). 1253-. ISSN 1664-462X

[img]
Preview
Text
Elliott-Kingston et al 2016.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

One strategy for plants to optimize stomatal function is to open and close their stomata quickly in response to environmental signals. It is generally assumed that small stomata can alter aperture faster than large stomata. We tested the hypothesis that species with small stomata close faster than species with larger stomata in response to darkness by comparing rate of stomatal closure across an evolutionary range of species includingferns, cycads, conifers, and angiosperms under controlled ambient conditions (380 ppm CO2; 20.9% O2). The two species with fastest half-closure time and the two species with slowest half-closure time had large stomata while the remaining three species had small stomata, implying that closing rate was not correlated with stomatal size in these species. Neither was response time correlated with stomatal density, phylogeny, functional group, or life strategy. Our results suggest that past atmospheric CO2 concentration during time of taxa diversification may influence stomatal response time. We show that species which last diversified under low or declining atmospheric CO2 concentration close stomata faster than species that last diversified in a high CO2 world. Low atmospheric [CO2] during taxa diversification may have placed a selection pressure on plants to accelerate stomatal closing to maintain adequate internal CO2 and optimize water use efficiency.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: stomata; half-closure time in response to darkness; stomatal size; atmospheric CO2 concentration; time of taxa diversification
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health
Faculty of Science and Health > Life Sciences, School of
SWORD Depositor: Elements
Depositing User: Elements
Date Deposited: 25 Aug 2016 14:32
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2022 18:29
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/17462

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item