Research Repository

A 2018 Horizon Scan of Emerging Issues for Global Conservation and Biological Diversity

Sutherland, WJ and Butchart, SHM and Connor, B and Culshaw, C and Dicks, LV and Dinsdale, J and Doran, H and Entwistle, AC and Fleishman, E and Gibbons, DW and Jiang, Z and Keim, B and Roux, XL and Lickorish, FA and Markillie, P and Monk, KA and Mortimer, D and Pearce-Higgins, JW and Peck, LS and Pretty, J and Seymour, CL and Spalding, MD and Tonneijck, FH and Gleave, RA (2018) 'A 2018 Horizon Scan of Emerging Issues for Global Conservation and Biological Diversity.' Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 33 (1). 47 - 58. ISSN 0169-5347

[img]
Preview
Text
1-s2.0-S0169534717302896-main.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

This is our ninth annual horizon scan to identify emerging issues that we believe could affect global biological diversity, natural capital and ecosystem services, and conservation efforts. Our diverse and international team, with expertise in horizon scanning, science communication, as well as conservation science, practice, and policy, reviewed 117 potential issues. We identified the 15 that may have the greatest positive or negative effects but are not yet well recognised by the global conservation community. Themes among these topics include new mechanisms driving the emergence and geographic expansion of diseases, innovative biotechnologies, reassessments of global change, and the development of strategic infrastructure to facilitate global economic priorities. This is the ninth such annual horizon scan. Twenty-four experts in conservation research and practice, ecology, economics, policy, and science communication identified 15 topics following a wide consultation. They followed a Delphi like process to score and identify the most important. The issues highlighted span a wide range of fields and include thiamine deficiency in wild animals, the geographic expansion of chronic wasting disease, genetic control of invasive mammal populations and the effect of culturomics on conservation science, policy and action.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: futures; novel issues; predictions; environment; climate change; emerging disease; biotechnology
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Biological Sciences, School of
Depositing User: Elements
Date Deposited: 01 Mar 2018 10:58
Last Modified: 24 May 2018 10:15
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/21571

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item