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The Association Between Believing in Free Will and Subjective Well-Being Is Confounded by a Sense of Personal Control

Gooding, PLT and Callan, MJ and Hughes, G (2018) 'The Association Between Believing in Free Will and Subjective Well-Being Is Confounded by a Sense of Personal Control.' Frontiers in Psychology, 9. ISSN 1664-1078

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Abstract

The extent to which an individual believes in free will is associated with a number of positive life outcomes, including their own subjective well-being. However, it is not known whether the belief that one has free will per se is uniquely associated with subjective well-being over and above potential confounding variables. We examined a sense of personal control as one such confound—specifically, whether the association between free will belief and subjective well-being is based, in part, on the degree to which an individual feels a sense of personal control over their life. In Study, 1 trait-level belief in personal control significantly uniquely predicted satisfaction with life and stress, over and above the contribution of free will belief. In Study 2, within-person daily fluctuations in stress and depression were not significantly predicted by daily changes in free will belief over and above the contribution of personal control/choice. The findings provide new insight into the relationship between free will belief and subjective well-being.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: free will, choice, control, satisfaction with life, subjective well-being, perceived stress, depression
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Psychology, Department of
Depositing User: Elements
Date Deposited: 18 May 2018 12:25
Last Modified: 28 May 2018 22:15
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/22062

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