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Age and connection to nature: when is engagement critical?

Hughes, Joelene and Rogerson, Michael and Barton, Jo and Bragg, Rachel (2019) 'Age and connection to nature: when is engagement critical?' Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. ISSN 1540-9295

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Abstract

Conservation organisations are increasingly aware of the need to connect people with nature to motivate behaviour. However, to maximise effectiveness from the limited resources available, organisations need to understand variability in connection to nature. This research examines connection to nature of people aged 5 to 75 years, using two popular measures, in a cross-sectional UK sample. The hypothesis was that there would be clear, age-related patterns in connection, with specific breakpoints associated with differences in feelings of connection. Data were collected across a variety of locations. Generalised Additive Models found similar age-related patterns from both measures, with connection declining from childhood to an overall low in the mid-teens; followed by a rise to the early 20s and reaching a plateau to the end of the lifetime. Both measures also showed females generally had higher connection scores than males. Implications for conservation are discussed.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Life Sciences, School of
Faculty of Science and Health > Sport, Rehabilitation and Exercise Sciences, School of
Depositing User: Elements
Date Deposited: 05 Apr 2019 10:24
Last Modified: 06 Sep 2019 12:15
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/23602

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