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Modulating proactive cognitive control by reward: differential anticipatory effects of performance-contingent and non-contingent rewards.

Yamaguchi, Motonori and Nishimura, Akio (2019) 'Modulating proactive cognitive control by reward: differential anticipatory effects of performance-contingent and non-contingent rewards.' Psychological Research, 83 (2). 258 - 274. ISSN 0340-0727

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Abstract

The present study investigated the influences of two different forms of reward presentation in modulating cognitive control. In three experiments, participants performed a flanker task for which one-third of trials were precued for a chance of obtaining a reward (reward trials). In Experiment 1, a reward was provided if participants made the correct response on reward trials, but a penalty was given if they made an incorrect response on these trials. The anticipation of this performance-contingent reward increased response speed and reduced the flanker effect, but had little influence on the sequential modulation of the flanker effect after incompatible trials. In Experiment 2, participants obtained a reward randomly on two-thirds of the precued reward trials and were given a penalty on the remaining one-third, regardless of their performance. The anticipation of this non-contingent reward had little influence on the overall response speed or flanker effect, but reduced the sequential modulation of the flanker effect after incompatible trials. Experiment 3 also used performance non-contingent rewards, but participants were randomly penalized more often than they were rewarded; non-contingent penalty had little influence on the sequential modulation of the flanker effect. None of the three experiments showed a reliable influence of the actual acquisition of rewards on task performance. These results indicate anticipatory effects of performance-contingent and non-contingent rewards on cognitive control with little evidence of aftereffects.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Humans, Motivation, Cognition, Reinforcement Schedule, Reward, Reaction Time, Female, Male, Young Adult, Anticipation, Psychological
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Psychology, Department of
Depositing User: Elements
Date Deposited: 23 Mar 2020 13:34
Last Modified: 23 Mar 2020 13:34
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/27108

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