Research Repository

Stimulus modality influences session-to-session transfer of training effects in auditory and tactile streaming-based P300 brain–computer interfaces

Ziebell, P and Stümpfig, J and Eidel, M and Kleih, SC and Kübler, A and Latoschik, ME and Halder, S (2020) 'Stimulus modality influences session-to-session transfer of training effects in auditory and tactile streaming-based P300 brain–computer interfaces.' Scientific Reports, 10 (1). ISSN 2045-2322

[img]
Preview
Text
s41598-020-67887-6.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (3MB) | Preview

Abstract

Despite recent successes, patients suffering from locked-in syndrome (LIS) still struggle to communicate using vision-independent brain–computer interfaces (BCIs). In this study, we compared auditory and tactile BCIs, regarding training effects and cross-stimulus-modality transfer effects, when switching between stimulus modalities. We utilized a streaming-based P300 BCI, which was developed as a low workload approach to prevent potential BCI-inefficiency. We randomly assigned 20 healthy participants to two groups. The participants received three sessions of training either using an auditory BCI or using a tactile BCI. In an additional fourth session, BCI versions were switched to explore possible cross-stimulus-modality transfer effects. Both BCI versions could be operated successfully in the first session by the majority of the participants, with the tactile BCI being experienced as more intuitive. Significant training effects were found mostly in the auditory BCI group and strong evidence for a cross-stimulus-modality transfer occurred for the auditory training group that switched to the tactile version but not vice versa. All participants were able to control at least one BCI version, suggesting that the investigated paradigms are generally feasible and merit further research into their applicability with LIS end-users. Individual preferences regarding stimulus modality should be considered.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, School of
Depositing User: Elements
Date Deposited: 21 Jul 2020 14:00
Last Modified: 21 Jul 2020 14:00
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/28264

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item