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Embodiment and American Sign Language Exploring sensory-motor influences in the recognition of American Sign Language

Corina, David P and Gutierrez, Eva (2016) 'Embodiment and American Sign Language Exploring sensory-motor influences in the recognition of American Sign Language.' Gesture, 15 (3). 291 - 305. ISSN 1568-1475

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Abstract

Little is known about how individual signs that occur in naturally produced signed languages are recognized. Here we examine whether sign understanding may be grounded in sensorimotor properties by evaluating a signer’s ability to make lexical decisions to American Sign Language (ASL) signs that are articulated either congruent with or incongruent with the observer’s own handedness. Our results show little evidence for handedness congruency effects for native signers’ perception of ASL, however handedness congruency effects were seen in non-native late learners of ASL and hearing ASL-English bilinguals. The data are compatible with a theory of sign recognition that makes reference to internally simulated articulatory control signals — a forward model based upon sensory-motor properties of one’s owns body. The data suggest that sign recognition may rely upon an internal body schema when processing is non-optimal as a result of having learned ASL later in life. Native signers however may have developed representations of signs which are less bound to the hand with which it is performed, suggesting a different engagement of an internal forward model for rapid lexical decisions.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: American Sign Language , deaf , embodiment and handedness
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Psychology, Department of
Depositing User: Elements
Date Deposited: 27 Jan 2021 09:35
Last Modified: 27 Jan 2021 09:35
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/29634

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