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Reversing the Luminance Polarity of Control Faces: Why Are Some Negative Faces Harder to Recognize, but Easier to See?

Webb, Abigail LM (2021) 'Reversing the Luminance Polarity of Control Faces: Why Are Some Negative Faces Harder to Recognize, but Easier to See?' Frontiers in Psychology, 11. ISSN 1664-1078

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Abstract

Control stimuli are key for understanding the extent to which face processing relies on holistic processing, and affective evaluation versus the encoding of low-level image properties. Luminance polarity (LP) reversal combined with face inversion is a popular tool for severely disrupting the recognition of face controls. However, recent findings demonstrate visibility-recognition trade-offs for LP-reversed faces, where these face controls sometimes appear more salient despite being harder to recognize. The present report brings together findings from image analysis, simple stimuli, and behavioral data for facial recognition and visibility, in an attempt to disentangle instances where LP-reversed control faces are associated with a performance bias in terms of their perceived salience. These findings have important implications for studies of subjective face appearance, and highlight that future research must be aware of behavioral artifacts due to the possibility of trade-off effects.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: face perception, control faces, luminance polarity, skewness, facial recognition, apparent contrast, negative faces, spatial inversion
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Psychology, Department of
Depositing User: Elements
Date Deposited: 18 Mar 2021 15:25
Last Modified: 21 Jun 2021 21:15
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/30067

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