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Using Intersectionality Theory to explore the experiences of students from African Caribbean and South Asian heritage and who have a Special Educational Need and/or Disability (SEND) in Further Education.

Shonibare, Jason (2021) Using Intersectionality Theory to explore the experiences of students from African Caribbean and South Asian heritage and who have a Special Educational Need and/or Disability (SEND) in Further Education. Other thesis, University of Essex & Tavistock and Portman NHS Trust.

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Abstract

The coronavirus outbreak disproportionately affected ethnically minoritised groups in the UK and US. This health crisis coincided with mass Black Lives Matter (BLM) protests in response to the killing of unarmed African Americans by the police. Both event series brought awareness to the impact of racial inequality, systemic oppression and raised further questions about the treatment of minorities within the minority such as women of colour. Comparatively, the UK has a growing body of research that explores the role of systemic factors in the disproportionate exclusion rates for Caribbean boys and students with SEND. Adapting key Intersectionality Theory concepts, Dis/ability Critical Race Studies explore the intersections of race and ability to platform those whose experience may otherwise be invalidated and/or under-researched. This study aims to gain insights into students who experiences intersect of their race, ethnicity and ability in Further Education (FE). The study recruited 4 students attending the same FE setting. Participants described themselves as being from either a Bangladeshi, African Caribbean or mixed Caribbean and White British heritage. All were born in the UK and had SEND. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was used to analyse semi-structured interview data which produced overarching themes on ‘adverse early education’, ‘race, ethnicity and cultural connection’, ‘parental context and influence’, ‘broad and fluid identity’, ‘systems of power’ and ‘the power of self’. The findings are discussed in relation to the existing knowledge base and relevant psychological theory. The implications for the community of focus, FE sector and Educational Psychologists are also considered.

Item Type: Thesis (Other)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
L Education > LB Theory and practice of education > LB1603 Secondary Education. High schools
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Psychology, Department of
Depositing User: Jason Shonibare
Date Deposited: 03 Sep 2021 10:07
Last Modified: 03 Sep 2021 10:07
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/31017

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