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Tracking the mental health of home-carers during the first COVID-19 national lockdown: evidence from a nationally representative UK survey

Whitley, Elise and Reeve, Kelly and Benzeval, Michaela (2021) 'Tracking the mental health of home-carers during the first COVID-19 national lockdown: evidence from a nationally representative UK survey.' Psychological Medicine. pp. 1-10. ISSN 0033-2917

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Abstract

Background: Unpaid carers who look after another member of their household (home-carers) have poorer mental health than the general population. The first COVID-19 national lockdown led to an increasing reliance on home-carers and we investigate the short and longer-Term impact of lockdown on their mental health. Methods: Data from 9,737 adult participants (aged 16+) from the UK Household Longitudinal Study (Understanding Society) were used to explore changes in 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) score between (a) pre-pandemic (2019) and early lockdown (April 2020) and (b) early and later (July 2020) lockdown. Results: GHQ-12 scores among home-carers were higher pre-lockdown and increased more than for non-carers from 2019 to April 2020 with further increases for home-carers compared with non-carers between April and July. Compared with respondents caring for a spouse/partner, those caring for a child under 18 had a particularly marked increase in GHQ-12 score between 2019 and April, as did those caring for someone with learning difficulties. Home-carers of children under 18 improved from April to July while those caring for adult children saw a marked worsening of their mental health. Home-carers with greater care burden saw larger increases in GHQ-12 score from 2019 to April and from April to July, and increases through both periods were greater for home-carers who had formal help prior to lockdown but then lost it. Conclusions: The mental health of home-carers deteriorated more during lockdown than non-carers. Policies that reinstate support for them and their care-recipients will benefit the health of both vulnerable groups.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Carers; COVID-19; inequalities; longitudinal; mental health
Divisions: Faculty of Social Sciences
Faculty of Social Sciences > Institute for Social and Economic Research
SWORD Depositor: Elements
Depositing User: Elements
Date Deposited: 03 Dec 2021 13:57
Last Modified: 28 Sep 2022 10:17
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/31616

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