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Diurnal pattern of salivary cortisol and progression of aortic stiffness: Longitudinal study.

Ikeda, Ai and Steptoe, Andrew and Shipley, Martin and Abell, Jessica and Kumari, Meena and Tanigawa, Takeshi and Iso, Hiroyasu and Wilkinson, Ian B and McEniery, Carmel M and Singh-Manoux, Archana and Kivimaki, Mika and Brunner, Eric J (2021) 'Diurnal pattern of salivary cortisol and progression of aortic stiffness: Longitudinal study.' Psychoneuroendocrinology, 133. p. 105372. ISSN 0306-4530

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Abstract

Background The positive direct relation between stress and the development of cardiovascular disease has increasingly been recognized. However, the link between hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) dysregulation and subclinical cardiovascular disease has not been studied longitudinally. We investigated the relation of diurnal salivary cortisol, as a biological marker of stress levels, with progression of aortic stiffness over five years. Methods A total of 3281 people (mean age 65.5) in the Whitehall II prospective study provided six saliva samples on a single weekday. We assessed the diurnal salivary cortisol using the daytime slope and bedtime level. Aortic stiffness was measured by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) at baseline (2007-2009) and five years later (2012-2013). Linear mixed models were used to estimate the association of diurnal salivary cortisol with baseline PWV and five-year longitudinal changes. Results Diurnal salivary cortisol were not associated with PWV at baseline. Among women but not men, a 1-SD shallower salivary cortisol slope at baseline was associated with a five-year increase in PWV (β = 0.199; 95% CI = 0.040, 0.358 m/s) and higher bedtime cortisol level (β = 0.208, 95% CI = 0.062, 0.354 m/s). Conclusions Dysregulation of the HPA axis measured using salivary cortisol (shallower slope, higher bedtime level) predicted the rate of progression of aortic stiffness among women.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Cortisol; Aortic pulse wave velocity; Aortic stiffness; Longitudinal study
Divisions: Faculty of Social Sciences
Faculty of Social Sciences > Institute for Social and Economic Research
SWORD Depositor: Elements
Depositing User: Elements
Date Deposited: 03 Dec 2021 16:48
Last Modified: 06 Jan 2022 14:32
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/31826

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