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Collaborative Public Service Provision Archetypes in Healthcare Emergencies: A Case of COVID-19 Administration in Sri Lanka

Jayasinghe, Kelum and Wijesinghe, Chandana and Wijethilake, Chaminda and Prasanna, Raj (2022) 'Collaborative Public Service Provision Archetypes in Healthcare Emergencies: A Case of COVID-19 Administration in Sri Lanka.' Journal of Public Budgeting Accounting and Financial Management, 34 (3). pp. 391-410. ISSN 1096-3367

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Abstract

Purpose – This paper examines how the properties and patterns of a collaborative ‘networked hierarchy’ incident command system (ICS) archetype can provide incident command centres with extra capabilities to manage public service delivery during COVID-19. Design/Methodology/Approach – The paper illustrates the case of Sri Lanka’s COVID-19 administration during its ‘first wave’ (from 15 February to 1 September 2020). Primary data were collected through in-depth interviews with government officials who were directly involved in the administration of the COVID-19 outbreak. Secondary data gathered through publicly available documents and quotes in the media The data were analysed and interpreted by using narrative analysis and archetype theory respectively. Findings –The findings highlight how Sri Lanka’s public sector responses to COVID-19 has followed a collaborative ‘networked hierarchy’ ICS archetype. More specifically, the government changed its normative ICS ‘properties’ by incorporating a diverse group of intergovernmental agencies such as the police, the military, the health service and administrative services by articulating new patterns of collaborative working, namely, organisational values, beliefs and ideas that fit with the Sri Lankan public service context. Originality/Value – In responding to high magnitude healthcare emergencies, the flexibility of a collaborative networked ICS hierarchy enables different balances of organisational properties to be incorporated, such as hierarchy and horizontal networking and ‘patterns’ in public service provision.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: Faculty of Social Sciences
Faculty of Social Sciences > Essex Business School
Faculty of Social Sciences > Essex Business School > Essex Accounting Centre
SWORD Depositor: Elements
Depositing User: Elements
Date Deposited: 14 Dec 2021 16:54
Last Modified: 07 May 2022 19:19
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/31891

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