Research Repository

Net Neutrality

Marsden, Christopher T (2010) Net Neutrality. Bloomsbury Academic.

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Abstract

Net Neutrality is a very heated and contested policy principle regarding access for content providers to the Internet end-user, and potential discrimination in that access where the end-user's ISP (or another ISP) blocks that access in part or whole. The suggestion has been that the problem can be resolved by either introducing greater competition, or closely policing conditions for vertically integrated service, such as VOIP. However, that is not the whole story, and ISPs as a whole have incentives to discriminate between content for matters such as network management of spam, to secure and maintain customer experience at current levels, and for economic benefit from new Quality of Service standards. This includes offering a 'priority lane' on the network for premium content types such as video and voice service. The author considers market developments and policy responses in Europe and the United States, draws conclusions and proposes regulatory recommendations.

Item Type: Book
Uncontrolled Keywords: network neutrality; Internet policy; co-regulation; self-regulation; media policy; law and economics; censorship
Subjects: K Law > K Law (General)
Q Science > QA Mathematics > QA75 Electronic computers. Computer science
Divisions: Faculty of Humanities > Essex Law School
SWORD Depositor: Elements
Depositing User: Elements
Date Deposited: 10 Dec 2012 14:28
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2022 19:50
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/4595

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