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Mechanisms of intentional binding and sensory attenuation: The role of temporal prediction, temporal control, identity prediction, and motor prediction

Hughes, G and Desantis, A and Waszak, F (2013) 'Mechanisms of intentional binding and sensory attenuation: The role of temporal prediction, temporal control, identity prediction, and motor prediction.' Psychological Bulletin, 139 (1). 133 - 151. ISSN 0033-2909

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Abstract

Sensory processing of action effects has been shown to differ from that of externally triggered stimuli, with respect both to the perceived timing of their occurrence (intentional binding) and to their intensity (sensory attenuation). These phenomena are normally attributed to forward action models, such that when action prediction is consistent with changes in our environment, our experience of these effects is altered. Although much progress has been made in recent years in understanding sensory attenuation and intentional binding, a number of important questions regarding the precise nature of the predictive mechanisms involved remain unanswered. Moreover, these mechanisms are often not discussed in empirical papers, and a comprehensive review of these issues is yet to appear. This review attempts to fill this void. We systematically investigated the role of temporal prediction, temporal control, identity prediction, and motor prediction in previous published reports of sensory attenuation and intentional binding. By isolating the individual processes that have previously been contrasted and incorporating these experiments with research in the related fields of temporal attention and stimulus expectation, we assessed the degree to which existing data provide evidence for the role of forward action models in these phenomena. We further propose a number of avenues for future research, which may help to better determine the role of motor prediction in processing of voluntary action effects, as well as to improve understanding of how these phenomena might fit within a general predictive processing framework. Furthermore, our analysis has important implications for understanding disorders of agency in schizophrenia. © 2012 American Psychological Association.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Psychology, Department of
Depositing User: Jim Jamieson
Date Deposited: 11 Jan 2013 09:58
Last Modified: 17 Aug 2017 18:04
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/5046

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