Research Repository

Idea density measured in late life predicts subsequent cognitive trajectories: Implications for the measurement of cognitive reserve

Farias, ST and Chand, V and Bonnici, L and Baynes, K and Harvey, D and Mungas, D and Simon, C and Reed, B (2012) 'Idea density measured in late life predicts subsequent cognitive trajectories: Implications for the measurement of cognitive reserve.' Journals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 67 B (6). 677 - 686. ISSN 1079-5014

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Objective.The Nun Study showed that lower linguistic ability in young adulthood, measured by idea density (ID), increased the risk of dementia in late life. The present study examined whether ID measured in late life continues to predict the trajectory of cognitive change.Method.ID was measured in 81 older adults who were followed longitudinally for an average of 4.3 years. Changes in global cognition and 4 specific neuropsychological domains (episodic memory, semantic memory, spatial abilities, and executive function) were examined as outcomes. Separate random effects models tested the effect of ID on longitudinal change in outcomes, adjusted for age and education.Results.Lower ID was associated with greater subsequent decline in global cognition, semantic memory, episodic memory, and spatial abilities. When analysis was restricted to only participants without dementia at the time ID was collected, results were similar.Discussion.Linguistic ability in young adulthood, as measured by ID, has been previously proposed as an index of neurocognitive development and/or cognitive reserve. The present study provides evidence that even when ID is measured in old age, it continues to be associated with subsequent cognitive decline and as such may continue to provide a marker of cognitive reserve. © 2012 The Author.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: P Language and Literature > P Philology. Linguistics
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Divisions: Faculty of Social Sciences > Language and Linguistics, Department of
Depositing User: Jim Jamieson
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2013 13:03
Last Modified: 06 Mar 2018 13:15
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/5456

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item