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Cognitive Bias Modification in the Treatment of Social Anxiety in Early Psychosis: A Single Case Series

Turner, Ruth and Hoppitt, Laura and Hodgekins, Joanne and Wilkinson, Judith and Mackintosh, Bundy and Fowler, David (2011) 'Cognitive Bias Modification in the Treatment of Social Anxiety in Early Psychosis: A Single Case Series.' Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 39 (3). 341 - 347. ISSN 1352-4658

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Abstract

<jats:p><jats:bold>Background:</jats:bold> Social anxiety is a common problem among people who are recovering from psychosis. At present there is no evidence based psychological treatment targeting social anxiety in this population. Cognitive Bias Modification for Interpretation (CBM-I) has been shown to be effective in reducing social anxiety in people who do not have a history of psychosis. <jats:bold>Aims:</jats:bold> To assess the feasibility and acceptability of the CBM-I methodology for use in a clinical setting with people who are experiencing social anxiety following an episode of psychosis. <jats:bold>Method:</jats:bold> Eight participants with social anxiety were recruited from an early intervention service. A single session of computerized CBM-I was conducted, with mood and cognitive interpretation bias being assessed before and after the session. <jats:bold>Results:</jats:bold> All participants reported an improvement in mood immediately following the CBM-I session (<jats:italic>n</jats:italic> = 8). For those participants who had a negative interpretation bias, none became more negative following the CBM-I session, with three out of six participants showing a beneficial change. <jats:bold>Conclusion:</jats:bold> These results suggest that CBM-I is acceptable for use with people who are experiencing social anxiety following a psychotic episode. Further research looking at how CBM-I could be made more interactive and producing more applicable scenarios for use in a clinical setting is recommended.</jats:p>

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Psychology, Department of
Depositing User: Jim Jamieson
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2013 19:10
Last Modified: 02 May 2019 14:15
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/5643

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