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Dimethyl sulfide triggers search behavior in copepods

Steinke, M and Stefels, J and Stamhuis, E (2006) 'Dimethyl sulfide triggers search behavior in copepods.' Limnology and Oceanography, 51 (4). 1925 - 1930. ISSN 0024-3590

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Abstract

The oceans are nutritionally dilute, and finding food is a major challenge for many zooplanktonic predators. Chemodetection is necessary for successful prey-capture, but little is known about the infochemicals involved in the interaction between herbivorous copepods and their phytoplankton prey. We used females of Temora longicornis to investigate chemodetection of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) in this calanoid copepod and quantified its behavioral response to plumes of DMS using video-microscopy in combination with laser-sheet particle image velocimetry (PIV). Slow injection of a 1-μmol L-1 DMS plume into the feeding current resulted in a characteristic behavioral pattern ("tail-flapping"), a redirection of flow equivalent to 30% of the average current velocity, and changes in the location of flow-induced vortices. In free-swimming individuals, this likely results in somersault-type movements that are associated with search behavior in copepods. In comparison to seawater controls, DMS injections significantly increased the average number of tail-flaps per copepod during the first 2 s after exposure to DMS gradients. Our results demonstrate that copepods can detect and react to plumes of DMS and suggest that this biogenic trace gas can influence the structure and function of pelagic foodwebs. © 2006, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Biological Sciences, School of
Depositing User: Michael Steinke
Date Deposited: 07 Mar 2013 14:56
Last Modified: 30 Jan 2019 16:22
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/5662

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