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Particulate pollution in different housing types in a UK suburban location

Nasir, ZA and Colbeck, I (2013) 'Particulate pollution in different housing types in a UK suburban location.' Science of the Total Environment, 445-44. 165 - 176. ISSN 0048-9697

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Abstract

To investigate the levels of particulate pollution in residential built environments measurements of PM10, PM2.5, and PM1 and concentrations were made between 2004 and 2008 in various residencies in a UK suburban location. Measurements were carried out in three different residential settings (Types I, II and III). In type I non-smoking living rooms, the highest 24-hour mean concentrations were found in summer. When smoking took place in type I residences, the concentrations of PM10, PM2.5 and PM1, during the winter were almost double those in summer. In type II houses the concentrations were higher in the houses with open plan kitchens than in those with separate kitchens. In type III houses, mean concentrations were significantly higher in wood heated living rooms than those using central heating. In kitchens, cooking resulted in substantially higher concentrations of particulate matter with levels above those in smoking living rooms in winter. The hourly maximum values of number concentration were considerably higher in smoking rooms than non-smoking ones. Cooking resulted in increased number concentrations, with the average hourly maximum concentration of 179,110 #/cm3. Particle mass and number emission rates were determined for a number of activities. In kitchens grilling had the highest average number emission rate, followed by boiling and frying. The results clearly highlight the impact of different forms of dwelling and their use and management by occupants on the levels of particulate matter in naturally ventilated residential built environments. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Life Sciences, School of
Depositing User: Jim Jamieson
Date Deposited: 13 Mar 2013 11:21
Last Modified: 12 Nov 2019 20:15
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/5827

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