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Indoor particulate matter in developing countries: A case study in Pakistan and potential intervention strategies

Nasir, ZA and Colbeck, I and Ali, Z and Ahmad, S (2013) 'Indoor particulate matter in developing countries: A case study in Pakistan and potential intervention strategies.' Environmental Research Letters, 8 (2). ISSN 1748-9326

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Abstract

Around three billion people, largely in low and middle income countries, rely on biomass fuels for their household energy needs. The combustion of these fuels generates a range of hazardous indoor air pollutants and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Worldwide, it is responsible for four million deaths. A reduction in indoor smoke can have a significant impact on lives and can help achieve many of the Millennium Developments Goals. This letter presents details of a seasonal variation in particulate matter (PM) concentrations in kitchens using biomass fuels as a result of relocating the cooking space. During the summer, kitchens were moved outdoors and as a result the 24 h average PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 fell by 35%, 22% and 24% respectively. However, background concentrations of PM10 within the village increased by 62%. In locations where natural gas was the dominant fuel, the PM concentrations within the kitchen as well as outdoors were considerably lower than those in locations using biomass. These results highlights the importance of ventilation and fuel type for PM levels and suggest that an improved design of cooking spaces would result in enhanced indoor air quality. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Life Sciences, School of
Depositing User: Jim Jamieson
Date Deposited: 22 Jul 2013 14:26
Last Modified: 12 Nov 2019 20:15
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/7188

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