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Physical strain of handcycling: An evaluation using training guidelines for a healthy lifestyle as defined by the American College of Sports Medicine

Hettinga, FJ and De Groot, S and Van Dijk, F and Kerkhof, F and Woldring, F and Van Der Woude, L (2013) 'Physical strain of handcycling: An evaluation using training guidelines for a healthy lifestyle as defined by the American College of Sports Medicine.' Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine, 36 (4). 376 - 382. ISSN 1079-0268

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Abstract

Objective: Developments in assistive technology such as handcycling provide attractive possibilities to pursue a healthy lifestyle for patients with spinal cord injury. The objective of the study is to evaluate physical stress and strain of handcycling against training guidelines as defined by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). Design: Seven able-bodied males conducted an incremental peak exercise handcycling test on a treadmill. In addition, two indoor treadmill (1.3 m/second with an inclination of 0.7% and 1.0 m/second with an inclination of 4.8%) and three outdoor over ground exercise bouts were performed (1.7, 3.3, and 5.0 m/second). One individual handcycled a representative 8-km-distance outdoors. Outcome measures: Physical stress and strain were described in terms of absolute and relative power output, oxygen uptake (VO2), gross efficiency (GE), and heart rate (HR). Also, local perceived discomfort (LPD) was determined. Results: Relative handcycling exercise intensities varied between 23.3 ± 4.2 (below the ACSM lower limit of 46%VO2peak) and 72.5 ± 15.1%VO2peak (well above the ACSM lower limit), with GE ranging from 6.0 ± 1.5% at the lower to 13.0 ± 2.6% at the higher exercise intensities. Exercise intensities were performed at 49.8 ± 4.2 to 80.1 ± 10.5%HRpeak. LPD scores were low to moderate (<27 ± 7). Conclusion: Handcycling is relatively efficient and exercise intensities > 46%VO2peak were elicited. However, exercise load seems to be underestimated using %HRpeak. LPD was not perceived as limiting. Physiological stress and strain in able-bodied individuals appear to be comparable to individuals with a paraplegia. To understand individualize and optimize upper-body training, different training programs must be evaluated. © The Academy of Spinal Cord Injury Professionals, Inc. 2013.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Sport, Rehabilitation and Exercise Sciences, School of
Depositing User: Jim Jamieson
Date Deposited: 04 Dec 2013 12:45
Last Modified: 23 Jan 2019 00:18
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/8291

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