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Both human and mouse mesenchymal stem cells promote breast cancer metastasis

Albarenque, SM and Zwacka, RM and Mohr, A (2011) 'Both human and mouse mesenchymal stem cells promote breast cancer metastasis.' Stem Cell Research, 7 (2). 163 - 171. ISSN 1873-5061

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Abstract

Cell therapy has the potential to offer novel treatment modalities for a number of diseases including cancer, and stem cells and in particular mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been experimentally used to deliver therapeutic transgenes. However, conflicting reports have on the one side found that human MSCs can promote metastasis, while on the other hand other studies have shown that MSCs can stall the growth of metastatic lesions. In order to clarify the role of MSCs in metastasis development, we tested whether murine MSCs would behave similarly to human cells in mice. We found that the tissue distribution of human and mouse MSCs was nearly identical after intravenous injection. In mice with MDA-MB-231 mammary carcinoma xenografts we found that a fraction of MSCs infiltrated the primary tumor mass, but that the general tissue distribution of MSCs was unaffected by the tumor-burden. About half of the tumor-burdened animals that were treated with murine and human MSCs, respectively, harbored metastatic lesions with only 17% of controls showing metastatic nodules. Hence, both human and mouse MSCs possess metastasis-promoting activity raising concerns about the safe use of MSCs, but at the same time making the use of murine transgenic model systems feasible to study the role of MSCs in metastasis development and possibly finding ways of using them safely as cell therapeutic vehicles. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0254 Neoplasms. Tumors. Oncology (including Cancer)
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health > Life Sciences, School of
Depositing User: Jim Jamieson
Date Deposited: 29 Nov 2013 12:36
Last Modified: 23 Aug 2019 23:15
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/8318

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