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The genomes of four tapeworm species reveal adaptations to parasitism

Tsai, Isheng J and Zarowiecki, Magdalena and Holroyd, Nancy and Garciarrubio, Alejandro and Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro and Brooks, Karen L and Tracey, Alan and Bobes, Raúl J and Fragoso, Gladis and Sciutto, Edda and Aslett, Martin and Beasley, Helen and Bennett, Hayley M and Cai, Jianping and Camicia, Federico and Clark, Richard and Cucher, Marcela and De Silva, Nishadi and Day, Tim A and Deplazes, Peter and Estrada, Karel and Fernández, Cecilia and Holland, Peter WH and Hou, Junling and Hu, Songnian and Huckvale, Thomas and Hung, Stacy S and Kamenetzky, Laura and Keane, Jacqueline A and Kiss, Ferenc and Koziol, Uriel and Lambert, Olivia and Liu, Kan and Luo, Xuenong and Luo, Yingfeng and Macchiaroli, Natalia and Nichol, Sarah and Paps, Jordi and Parkinson, John and Pouchkina-Stantcheva, Natasha and Riddiford, Nick and Rosenzvit, Mara and Salinas, Gustavo and Wasmuth, James D and Zamanian, Mostafa and Zheng, Yadong and Cai, Xuepeng and Soberón, Xavier and Olson, Peter D and Laclette, Juan P and Brehm, Klaus and Berriman, Matthew (2013) 'The genomes of four tapeworm species reveal adaptations to parasitism.' Nature, 496 (7443). pp. 57-63. ISSN 0028-0836

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Abstract

Tapeworms (Cestoda) cause neglected diseases that can be fatal and are difficult to treat, owing to inefficient drugs. Here we present an analysis of tapeworm genome sequences using the human-infective species Echinococcus multilocularis, E. granulosus, Taenia solium and the laboratory model Hymenolepis microstoma as examples. The 115-to 141-megabase genomes offer insights into the evolution of parasitism. Synteny is maintained with distantly related blood flukes but we find extreme losses of genes and pathways that are ubiquitous in other animals, including 34 homeobox families and several determinants of stem cell fate. Tapeworms have specialized detoxification pathways, metabolism that is finely tuned to rely on nutrients scavenged from their hosts, and species-specific expansions of non-canonical heat shock proteins and families of known antigens. We identify new potential drug targets, including some on which existing pharmaceuticals may act. The genomes provide a rich resource to underpin the development of urgently needed treatments and control. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Taenia solium Genome Consortium; Stem Cells; Animals; Humans; Cestoda; Echinococcus granulosus; Echinococcus multilocularis; Hymenolepis; Taenia solium; Parasites; Cestode Infections; Proteome; Adaptation, Physiological; Conserved Sequence; Genes, Helminth; Genes, Homeobox; HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins; Genome, Helminth; Metabolic Networks and Pathways; Biological Evolution; Molecular Targeted Therapy
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH426 Genetics
Divisions: Faculty of Science and Health
Faculty of Science and Health > Life Sciences, School of
SWORD Depositor: Elements
Depositing User: Elements
Date Deposited: 07 Oct 2015 13:28
Last Modified: 15 Jan 2022 00:49
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/15226

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