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Investigating the causal effect of smoking on hay fever and asthma: A Mendelian randomization meta-analysis in the CARTA consortium

Skaaby, T and Taylor, AE and Jacobsen, RK and Paternoster, L and Thuesen, BH and Ahluwalia, TS and Larsen, SC and Zhou, A and Wong, A and Gabrielsen, ME and Bjørngaard, JH and Flexeder, C and Männistö, S and Hardy, R and Kuh, D and Barry, SJ and Møllehave, LT and Cerqueira, C and Friedrich, N and Bonten, TN and Noordam, R and Mook-Kanamori, DO and Taube, C and Jessen, LE and McConnachie, A and Sattar, N and Upton, MN and McSharry, C and Bønnelykke, K and Bisgaard, H and Schulz, H and Strauch, K and Meitinger, T and Peters, A and Grallert, H and Nohr, EA and Kivimaki, M and Kumari, M and Völker, U and Nauck, M and Völzke, H and Power, C and Hyppönen, E and Hansen, T and Jørgensen, T and Pedersen, O and Salomaa, V and Grarup, N and Langhammer, A and Romundstad, PR and Skorpen, F and Kaprio, J and Munafò, MR and Linneberg, A (2017) 'Investigating the causal effect of smoking on hay fever and asthma: A Mendelian randomization meta-analysis in the CARTA consortium.' Scientific Reports, 7 (1). ISSN 2045-2322

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Abstract

© The Author(s) 2017. Observational studies on smoking and risk of hay fever and asthma have shown inconsistent results. However, observational studies may be biased by confounding and reverse causation. Mendelian randomization uses genetic variants as markers of exposures to examine causal effects. We examined the causal effect of smoking on hay fever and asthma by using the smoking-associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs16969968/rs1051730. We included 231,020 participants from 22 population-based studies. Observational analyses showed that current vs never smokers had lower risk of hay fever (odds ratio (OR) = 0·68, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0·61, 0·76; P < 0·001) and allergic sensitization (OR = 0·74, 95% CI: 0·64, 0·86; P < 0·001), but similar asthma risk (OR = 1·00, 95% CI: 0·91, 1·09; P = 0·967). Mendelian randomization analyses in current smokers showed a slightly lower risk of hay fever (OR = 0·958, 95% CI: 0·920, 0·998; P = 0·041), a lower risk of allergic sensitization (OR = 0·92, 95% CI: 0·84, 1·02; P = 0·117), but higher risk of asthma (OR = 1·06, 95% CI: 1·01, 1·11; P = 0·020) per smoking-increasing allele. Our results suggest that smoking may be causally related to a higher risk of asthma and a slightly lower risk of hay fever. However, the adverse events associated with smoking limit its clinical significance.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Divisions: Faculty of Social Sciences > Institute for Social and Economic Research
Depositing User: Jim Jamieson
Date Deposited: 22 Jun 2017 15:54
Last Modified: 12 Dec 2017 21:15
URI: http://repository.essex.ac.uk/id/eprint/19937

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